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What Happens When You’re In a Coma?

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The word coma comes from the greek meaning of “deep sleep,” but what exactly does this unconscious state do to your brain?

Can A Brain Injury Make You a Genius? ►►►►

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How Comas Work

“Illnesses that affect the brain and brain injuries can both cause comas. If a person suffers severe head trauma, the impact can cause the brain to move back and forth inside the skull.”

How Active Is the Brain in a Coma?

“When doctors recently tested former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon brain with a functional MRI, they found “robust” brain activity when he was shown pictures of his family and heard his son’s voice. A stroke and brain hemorrhage left Sharon in a coma seven years ago.”

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31 Comments

31 Comments

  1. Trufi Taskbe

    November 21, 2017 at 2:57 am

    I have been in a coma, for about 3 weeks. it was brought on by pnumonia, which claimed all but the size of a quarter-dollar of my lungs. the doctors told my mother there was "a very good chance he will not make it." when i woke, i recognized my big brother almost immediately, but i didnt recognize my mother for a little while. I was able to make a full recovery since.

  2. SuicideBunny6

    November 21, 2017 at 9:59 pm

    Why does the Glasgow scale start at 3? Does it mean a 1 equals death?

  3. Dan Henry

    November 22, 2017 at 5:47 am

    cutting off blood flow

  4. Dan Henry

    November 22, 2017 at 5:51 am

    Would astral projection be possible while being in a coma?

  5. Jerrockz

    November 22, 2017 at 1:45 pm

    Cutting off blood flow

  6. whateva

    November 22, 2017 at 6:48 pm

    Just get on with it

  7. Tyrone Shoelaces

    November 22, 2017 at 8:16 pm

    "Cutting off blood flow"

  8. IDontBelieveInPenises

    November 23, 2017 at 4:38 am

    I was in a coma for 5 days after a Rally Car accident where I was sent into a barrel roll(The car was I recognizable except for the drivers compartment, when I saw it I realized how crazy strong Roll Cages are). I remember people talking to me but I could only sorta make out what they were saying. And for some reason I remember just not trying to talk back, and when I woke I remember choking on my oxygen tube and pulling it out.

  9. Beth Hill

    November 23, 2017 at 9:58 pm

    Omg big up for mentioning diabetes ic comas @me 7 months ago

  10. Adam Ray

    November 24, 2017 at 6:40 am

    Are you kidding me with that ad at the end? That might be the most overt and misplaced ad I've ever seen. This dissuades me from Harry's.

    "…Even in your hospital bed." Commercials and comas, together at last, That was a poor decision, so long Harry's. You're an idiot company or you let yourself get put in an idiotic place. Why are you selling razors to comas?

  11. Matt Poogerman

    November 24, 2017 at 10:16 pm

    IF YOU ARE READING THIS YOU HAVE BEEN IN A COMA FOR 20 YEARS.

    WE ARE TRYING A NEW TECHNIQUE
    WE DO NOT KNOW WHERE THIS MESSAGE WILL END UP IN YOUR DREAM BUT WE HOPE WE ARE GETTING THROUGH

    WE MISS YOU!

  12. Freesider

    November 25, 2017 at 4:28 am

    6 years ago i was in a coma for 11 days after falling down in a ravine with my motorcycle…. all i remember from my coma is that i hear distant voices….

  13. dannyboy

    November 25, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    Do you dream while your in a coma

  14. CJ S

    November 26, 2017 at 10:23 am

    My name is Mason. I was in a coma for years. Woke up with a stupid beard and my nurse Kelly saved my life. She was smoking hot. I left in her mustang GT and recovered from my coma at her house. We humped.. Found my killers and I took Senator Trent, to the blood bank!

  15. david dsouza

    November 26, 2017 at 2:52 pm

    I'm in coma 28 days, I still not recovered completely from paralyze

  16. Tina L. Waters

    November 28, 2017 at 5:10 am

    my brother was hit by a car going 70 mph knocked over a 100 feet and was hit by another car coming the other direction and shattered the windsheild with the top of his head and was thrown onto concrete. the paramedics were astonished he was even alive to transport. He was in a coma for a month, They really didn't give us any hope. told us to prepare that he wouldn't make it. but he did he awoke had to learn everything all over again. eat, walk, talk, write, etc…. even his reflexes were impaired at first, but today he has pretty much recovered to meet and talk to him you would not know that it had happened. other than a change personality before he was what I would call a loner. but today it very much a people person , the more the better.

  17. kelley vincent

    November 29, 2017 at 8:23 pm

    i was in a coma in intensive care for 1 month I call it my 1 month coma TRIP and I also dreamed things was has now happened since …..I dreamed i was dating a scouber diver and this girl nicked him off me ….the nurse who brought me out of the coma was the girl who nicked my scouber diver  boyfreind !!  Any way to cut a long story short she  has  now moved to Australer  where she meet her new boyfriend and guess what !!! he is a scouber diver instructer…….this is one of many predictions i dreamed …Sorry about my spelling .

  18. Future kinqz

    December 1, 2017 at 12:50 pm

    Hw can u survive in comma without food

  19. Suzanne Cooke

    December 1, 2017 at 1:19 pm

    I suffered necrotizing faciitis throughout my torso and was comatose for about a week. On and off I was vaguely aware of what was going on around me, but completely misinterpreted events. During a thunderstorm I thought pirates were crashing through the windows. All the while I was "asleep" , I was having amazing adventures; I didn't want to wake up. I've tried recording these dreams but what I write is so flat compared to the experience. Has anyone else experienced something similar?

  20. CatherineTheCatLover

    December 2, 2017 at 7:07 pm

    One of my best friends, fell off the school rooftop and was in a coma for 3 days and survived. What’s more, is her best friend (my crush) fell off the school roof in the same place, was in a coma for 3 months and survived. It’s weird how 2 best friends both fell from the same place and survived, isn’t it?

  21. Cindy Chartier

    December 4, 2017 at 5:05 am

    I was in a coma for 3 days and it's one of the most interesting experiences in my life but I wouldn't necessarily recommend it. It's like everything, I guess….there are both pros and cons.

  22. Portacus Maughan

    December 4, 2017 at 5:33 am

    So venom snake almost died in the 9 years he was in a coma?

  23. Vik Vids

    December 4, 2017 at 8:20 pm

    my friends bf he died after he had cancer aswell thats why he was in a coma

  24. Succulent Ravioli

    December 6, 2017 at 3:47 am

    Those skinless 3D models are extremely creepy

  25. Tara Flynn

    December 6, 2017 at 3:37 pm

    Hi, my name is Tara Flynn, & im Irish, in January 2008, i was rolled over by a 60000 snowplough, in Mammoth Lakes-California. i was fine initially after being hit, but a few hours later, i collapsed into a 9 month coma , im fully (nearly) fully better now, i lost all speech /memory & had to be incubated for a some months. however im a very active person, & am more or less perfect again, however the truck driver was doing something totally illegal- he was driving along with his front loader raised, obscuring his vision. my Mammoth trip was the most awesome thing in the world to me, its just a pity that my accident happened to me when i was only 22 years old. however im definitely planning a return visit this winter to Magic Mammoth!

  26. Ahmad Al-homaid

    December 8, 2017 at 12:56 pm

    I was in coma, and i died

  27. CriticalMass 21

    December 8, 2017 at 10:57 pm

    ,

  28. james melton

    December 9, 2017 at 10:42 am

    I just woke up at the end of this video! Where am I?

  29. smhaaokir

    December 10, 2017 at 1:52 am

    From what I think, coma is like a long sleep, when you wake up from a coma, it is as if you slept a normal sleep. You didn't feel the time pass by.

  30. Galvin Sorto

    December 11, 2017 at 7:07 am

    My uncle is in one idk what to do when i hear the news when hes not here in this world comment back it will help

  31. A K

    December 12, 2017 at 4:28 am

    Buck happens. Just ask Beatrix.

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Medical Discovery

IDZ Weekly | Deep Neural Network Acceleration for Image Analysis in Drug Discovery | Intel Software

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Learn about a recent collaboration with Novartis Pharmaceuticals, which utilizes a deep neural network to accelerate image analysis in early drug discovery by detecting and targeting exactly which cells in the body need treatment.

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Medical Discovery

Virtual Recap Preview: Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium 2018 – Joao Monteiro, MD, PhD

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Virtual Recap: Stanford Drug Discovery 2018
Learn more:

On April 23-24,2018 over 550 people gathered at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center to attend the Third Annual Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium. The event featured a broad range of speakers sharing their expertise in the fields of: academic drug discovery, academic-industry collaboration, science policy, publishing, and research funding. On the first day, the packed-house audience was treated to presentations from academic scientists engaged in groundbreaking research that is laying the foundation for future therapeutic approaches. These included Stanford based Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka, MD and Edgar Engleman, MD; Kathleen Giacomini, PhD, and Kevan Shokat, PhD from UCSF; and Hugh Rosen, MD, PhD, from the Scripps Research Institute.

Later that afternoon, attendees had the rare opportunity to interact with six top pharmaceutical executives and philanthropists: Ken Frazier, CEO of Merck; Robert Bradway, CEO of Amgen; Joseph Jimenez, former CEO of Novartis; Brent Saunders, CEO of Allergan; Patrick Soon-Shiong, MD, CEO of Nantworks; and Sanford Weill, the Chairman Emeritus of Citigroup and CEO of Casa Rosa Ventures. In this “View from the Top” session moderated by Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, the panelists offered their perspectives on drug discovery, including: the future of personalized medicine, the importance of focusing on disease prevention rather than treatment, and the concept that drug pricing could eventually be based on treatment outcomes. The first day ended with the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award to Roy Vagelos, MD, former CEO of Merck and current Board chair of Regeneron. Dr. Vagelos was acknowledged in part for his role in leveraging the power of the pharmaceutical industry to make a major impact on global health. During his term as Merck CEO, he personally committed to providing the drug Ivermectin free of charge to anyone in the world for the treatment of elephantiasis and river blindness, with the latter having been since eradicated in multiple Central and South American countries due to Dr. Vagelos’ efforts.

The second day of the Symposium opened with a Keynote address from Janet Woodcock, MD, the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who provided a look inside the agency’s new drug regulatory program. This was followed by important presentations about funding priorities from Gary Gibbons, MD, the Director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and Maria Millan, MD, President and CEO of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). Later, the audience was treated to a panel of editors representing the top publications in biomedical science: the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Medicine, Science, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. The meeting concluded with a dynamic Shark Tank-style session, in which representatives from eight competitively selected start-up biotechnology companies pitched their ideas to a panel of scientists, venture capitalists, and CEOs. The panelists who provided feedback were: George Scangos, PhD (CEO of Vir), Robert Robbins, MD (President of the University of Arizona), Roy Vagelos, MD, Amy Chang, MSEE (CEO of Accompany), Ram Shriram (Founder of Sherpalo), and Wende Hutton, MBA (General Partner, Canaan). The goal of this session was to have this stellar panel identify strengths and weaknesses of the strategies described in each presentation, providing invaluable advice to these budding entrepreneurs.

The organizers of the meeting, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD; Sanjay Malhotra, PhD; Kuldev Singh, MD; Mark Mercola, PhD; and Chaitan Khosla, PhD, are thrilled with the success of this gathering, and are already looking forward to the next iteration, which will be held April 22-23, 2019.

___

Copyright Keystone Symposia, 2018. All rights reserved.

About Keystone Symposia:
Keystone Symposia is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1972 that convenes 50-60 open, international scientific research conferences each year across the full range of the life sciences – from cardiovascular disease to immunology to neurobiology. The conferences accelerate life science discovery by bringing together and fostering collaboration among the world’s leading and next generation of research scientists.

Visit Keystone Symposia at:

Visit Virtual Keystone Symposia at:

For more videos:

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Outro music:
“Slider” by Blue Dot Sessions (

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Medical Discovery

Virtual Recap Preview: Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium 2018 – Janet Woodcock, MD

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Virtual Recap: Stanford Drug Discovery 2018
Learn more:

On April 23-24,2018 over 550 people gathered at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center to attend the Third Annual Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium. The event featured a broad range of speakers sharing their expertise in the fields of: academic drug discovery, academic-industry collaboration, science policy, publishing, and research funding. On the first day, the packed-house audience was treated to presentations from academic scientists engaged in groundbreaking research that is laying the foundation for future therapeutic approaches. These included Stanford based Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka, MD and Edgar Engleman, MD; Kathleen Giacomini, PhD, and Kevan Shokat, PhD from UCSF; and Hugh Rosen, MD, PhD, from the Scripps Research Institute.

Later that afternoon, attendees had the rare opportunity to interact with six top pharmaceutical executives and philanthropists: Ken Frazier, CEO of Merck; Robert Bradway, CEO of Amgen; Joseph Jimenez, former CEO of Novartis; Brent Saunders, CEO of Allergan; Patrick Soon-Shiong, MD, CEO of Nantworks; and Sanford Weill, the Chairman Emeritus of Citigroup and CEO of Casa Rosa Ventures. In this “View from the Top” session moderated by Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, the panelists offered their perspectives on drug discovery, including: the future of personalized medicine, the importance of focusing on disease prevention rather than treatment, and the concept that drug pricing could eventually be based on treatment outcomes. The first day ended with the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award to Roy Vagelos, MD, former CEO of Merck and current Board chair of Regeneron. Dr. Vagelos was acknowledged in part for his role in leveraging the power of the pharmaceutical industry to make a major impact on global health. During his term as Merck CEO, he personally committed to providing the drug Ivermectin free of charge to anyone in the world for the treatment of elephantiasis and river blindness, with the latter having been since eradicated in multiple Central and South American countries due to Dr. Vagelos’ efforts.

The second day of the Symposium opened with a Keynote address from Janet Woodcock, MD, the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who provided a look inside the agency’s new drug regulatory program. This was followed by important presentations about funding priorities from Gary Gibbons, MD, the Director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and Maria Millan, MD, President and CEO of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). Later, the audience was treated to a panel of editors representing the top publications in biomedical science: the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Medicine, Science, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. The meeting concluded with a dynamic Shark Tank-style session, in which representatives from eight competitively selected start-up biotechnology companies pitched their ideas to a panel of scientists, venture capitalists, and CEOs. The panelists who provided feedback were: George Scangos, PhD (CEO of Vir), Robert Robbins, MD (President of the University of Arizona), Roy Vagelos, MD, Amy Chang, MSEE (CEO of Accompany), Ram Shriram (Founder of Sherpalo), and Wende Hutton, MBA (General Partner, Canaan). The goal of this session was to have this stellar panel identify strengths and weaknesses of the strategies described in each presentation, providing invaluable advice to these budding entrepreneurs.

The organizers of the meeting, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD; Sanjay Malhotra, PhD; Kuldev Singh, MD; Mark Mercola, PhD; and Chaitan Khosla, PhD, are thrilled with the success of this gathering, and are already looking forward to the next iteration, which will be held April 22-23, 2019.

___

Copyright Keystone Symposia, 2018. All rights reserved.

About Keystone Symposia:
Keystone Symposia is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1972 that convenes 50-60 open, international scientific research conferences each year across the full range of the life sciences – from cardiovascular disease to immunology to neurobiology. The conferences accelerate life science discovery by bringing together and fostering collaboration among the world’s leading and next generation of research scientists.

Visit Keystone Symposia at:

Visit Virtual Keystone Symposia at:

For more videos:

Follow us on Twitter:

Like us on Facebook:

Link to us on LinkedIn:

Outro music:
“Slider” by Blue Dot Sessions (

Continue Reading

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