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New Model for Alzheimer’s, pt 2 – FORD BREWER MD MPH

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FORD BREWER MD MPH PrevMedHeartRisk.com
To prevent disability, heart attack, stroke, dementia – visit my Youtube Channel at

Or the PrevMed web site at

The NIA (National Institute of Aging) and AA (Alzheimer’s Association) recently formed another policy group. The purpose is to include the biomarkers and new biological models in research and disease development.

This is the citation for the NIH announcement of the new group.

This is the editorial describing the impact of the new group.

Recognized biomarkers include beta amyloid and tau. It’s recognized now that these happen 20 years earlier than the dementia.

Comorbidities or related diseases include PART (Primary Age Related Taupathy), ARTAG (Age Related Tau Astroglipathy), and CART (Cerebral Age Related TDP-43 with Sclerosis)( also known as hippocampal sclerosis).

About Dr. Brewer – Dr. Brewer started as an Emergency Doctor. After seeing too many patients coming in dead from early heart attacks, he went to Johns Hopkins to learn Preventive Medicine. He went on to run the post-graduate training program (residency) in Preventive Medicine at Hopkins. From there, he made a career of practicing and managing preventive medicine and primary care clinics. His later role in this area was Chief Medical Officer for Premise, which has over 500 primary care/ prevention clinics. He was also the Chief Medical Officer for MDLIVE, the second largest telemedicine company. More recently, he founded PrevMed, a heart attack, stroke, and diabetes prevention clinic.
At PrevMed, we focus on heart attack, stroke, disability, cancer and Alzheimer’s prevention. We find a lot of undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Treating unrecognized risk factors like diabetes allows reduction of risk. We provide state-of-the-art genetic testing, imaging, labs and telemedicine options. We serve patients who have already experienced an event as well as those have not developed a diagnosis or event. Our team of senior clinicians includes internationally recognized leaders in the research and treatment of cardiovascular disease, preventive medicine and wellness. We also provide preventive medicine by telemedicine technology to over 30 states. Contact Dr. Brewer at info@prevmedheartrisk.com or visit

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. John Lorscheider

    June 6, 2018 at 8:21 pm

    In addition to A+T+(N)+, development of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementias can also be influenced by vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. These vascular factors increase the risk of AD occurrence.

    "Cerebral small vessel disease and Alzheimer’s disease" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4629951/

  2. Akane Cortich

    June 7, 2018 at 1:33 am

    Thanks for this. I have dealt with a few people with very advanced AD. It is both confronting, incredibly strange, sometimes comical, and always sad. But as we are seeing we can maybe avert many of the risks through dietary choices – if we are willing to adopt them in time.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5717030/
    The current article discusses nutritional factors, including the benefits of adopting a calorically appropriate, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein and fat containing diet which appear to be the best way to prevent and/or delay the progression of both periodontal disease and AD. Virgin coconut oil and MCTs supplements provide ketone bodies which can support the brain, and help to improve oral microbiota. The current article also discusses multiple shared risk factors of periodontitis and AD in relation to their co-morbid status development. One important dental aspect highlighted at least a decade ago, but taken little notice of, is how fewer teeth alter people’s eating habits and their dietary choices, which impacts on oral, metabolic, GI tract and brain health. In the context of a multifactorial intervention (MEND™ programme), a lower carbohydrate diet supplemented with virgin coconut oil or MCT-Oils, fish or omega-3 fatty acids, selected nutrients or phytochemicals along with, for example, improvements in oral hygiene and sleep were necessary to improve oral health. These have already shown promise in delaying and even reversing symptoms of mild cognitive decline and AD (Bredesen, 2014; Bredesen et al., 2016). In conclusion, more research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of diet-based interventions in supporting oral health, and to assess the potential impact of nutrition on AD onset and progression.

    Coconut Oil Attenuates the Effects of Amyloid-β on Cortical…. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258035377_Coconut_Oil_Attenuates_the_Effects_of_Amyloid-b_on_Cortical_Neurons_In_Vitro [accessed Jun 07 2018].
    Abstract
    Dietary supplementation has been studied as an approach to ameliorating deficits associated with aging and neurodegeneration. We undertook this pilot study to investigate the effects of coconut oil supplementation directly on cortical neurons treated with amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in vitro. Our results indicate that neuron survival in cultures co-treated with coconut oil and Aβ is rescued compared to cultures exposed only to Aβ. Coconut oil co-treatment also attenuates Aβ-induced mitochondrial alterations. The results of this pilot study provide a basis for further investigation of the effects of coconut oil, or its constituents, on neuronal survival focusing on mechanisms that may be involved.

  3. mikenagoya

    June 7, 2018 at 3:46 am

    Ford Brewer, MD. Sound coming through nice and clear on my basic laptop speakers, don't worry about 'hifi', we look forward to your content 🙂 And, as usual, it was very interesting. I can say on the subject of memory, my short term, as in, did I put the milk back in the fridge – example, has improved since making changes in my life style. First was to be more active, second; eat much less carbs and higher fat content food (HFLC) and third pay much closer attention to nutrition using the https://cronometer.com. All the best M.

  4. Ellen K

    June 8, 2018 at 12:00 pm

    Hi Dr. Brewer; can I pose a hypothetical here, and perhaps get an opinion? If a person (60, Psoriatic Arthritis and PBC and using CPAP at night, but otherwise healthy (ish) ) has had two TIAs in a month, and has been taking Vitamin K for about 6 months for the benefit to their bones and arteries (big family history of heart attacks), could, possibly, (a) the clearing of placque from the arteries have caused whatever (clot?) caused the TIA, and/or (b) just the Vit. K itself (about 200 mg daily) caused too much coagulation and be the culprit? If MRI and angiograms and other tests have shown nothing definitively, should this person just stop the k entirely and to hell with their arteries? That is what they're doing currently, anyway. They eat their greens, but not vegetarian or anything like that. Low dose aspirin daily is all that has been prescribed so far. And is 80 mg. once a day enough or might it be taken more than once per day, as it's such a small dosage?
    Again, all hypothetical and just wondering….If you cannot say, I understand, and anything you actually can suggest would be greatly appreciated. (It's always something….)

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IDZ Weekly | Deep Neural Network Acceleration for Image Analysis in Drug Discovery | Intel Software

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Learn about a recent collaboration with Novartis Pharmaceuticals, which utilizes a deep neural network to accelerate image analysis in early drug discovery by detecting and targeting exactly which cells in the body need treatment.

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Virtual Recap Preview: Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium 2018 – Joao Monteiro, MD, PhD

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Virtual Recap: Stanford Drug Discovery 2018
Learn more:

On April 23-24,2018 over 550 people gathered at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center to attend the Third Annual Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium. The event featured a broad range of speakers sharing their expertise in the fields of: academic drug discovery, academic-industry collaboration, science policy, publishing, and research funding. On the first day, the packed-house audience was treated to presentations from academic scientists engaged in groundbreaking research that is laying the foundation for future therapeutic approaches. These included Stanford based Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka, MD and Edgar Engleman, MD; Kathleen Giacomini, PhD, and Kevan Shokat, PhD from UCSF; and Hugh Rosen, MD, PhD, from the Scripps Research Institute.

Later that afternoon, attendees had the rare opportunity to interact with six top pharmaceutical executives and philanthropists: Ken Frazier, CEO of Merck; Robert Bradway, CEO of Amgen; Joseph Jimenez, former CEO of Novartis; Brent Saunders, CEO of Allergan; Patrick Soon-Shiong, MD, CEO of Nantworks; and Sanford Weill, the Chairman Emeritus of Citigroup and CEO of Casa Rosa Ventures. In this “View from the Top” session moderated by Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, the panelists offered their perspectives on drug discovery, including: the future of personalized medicine, the importance of focusing on disease prevention rather than treatment, and the concept that drug pricing could eventually be based on treatment outcomes. The first day ended with the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award to Roy Vagelos, MD, former CEO of Merck and current Board chair of Regeneron. Dr. Vagelos was acknowledged in part for his role in leveraging the power of the pharmaceutical industry to make a major impact on global health. During his term as Merck CEO, he personally committed to providing the drug Ivermectin free of charge to anyone in the world for the treatment of elephantiasis and river blindness, with the latter having been since eradicated in multiple Central and South American countries due to Dr. Vagelos’ efforts.

The second day of the Symposium opened with a Keynote address from Janet Woodcock, MD, the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who provided a look inside the agency’s new drug regulatory program. This was followed by important presentations about funding priorities from Gary Gibbons, MD, the Director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and Maria Millan, MD, President and CEO of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). Later, the audience was treated to a panel of editors representing the top publications in biomedical science: the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Medicine, Science, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. The meeting concluded with a dynamic Shark Tank-style session, in which representatives from eight competitively selected start-up biotechnology companies pitched their ideas to a panel of scientists, venture capitalists, and CEOs. The panelists who provided feedback were: George Scangos, PhD (CEO of Vir), Robert Robbins, MD (President of the University of Arizona), Roy Vagelos, MD, Amy Chang, MSEE (CEO of Accompany), Ram Shriram (Founder of Sherpalo), and Wende Hutton, MBA (General Partner, Canaan). The goal of this session was to have this stellar panel identify strengths and weaknesses of the strategies described in each presentation, providing invaluable advice to these budding entrepreneurs.

The organizers of the meeting, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD; Sanjay Malhotra, PhD; Kuldev Singh, MD; Mark Mercola, PhD; and Chaitan Khosla, PhD, are thrilled with the success of this gathering, and are already looking forward to the next iteration, which will be held April 22-23, 2019.

___

Copyright Keystone Symposia, 2018. All rights reserved.

About Keystone Symposia:
Keystone Symposia is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1972 that convenes 50-60 open, international scientific research conferences each year across the full range of the life sciences – from cardiovascular disease to immunology to neurobiology. The conferences accelerate life science discovery by bringing together and fostering collaboration among the world’s leading and next generation of research scientists.

Visit Keystone Symposia at:

Visit Virtual Keystone Symposia at:

For more videos:

Follow us on Twitter:

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Outro music:
“Slider” by Blue Dot Sessions (

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Virtual Recap Preview: Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium 2018 – Janet Woodcock, MD

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Virtual Recap: Stanford Drug Discovery 2018
Learn more:

On April 23-24,2018 over 550 people gathered at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center to attend the Third Annual Stanford Drug Discovery Symposium. The event featured a broad range of speakers sharing their expertise in the fields of: academic drug discovery, academic-industry collaboration, science policy, publishing, and research funding. On the first day, the packed-house audience was treated to presentations from academic scientists engaged in groundbreaking research that is laying the foundation for future therapeutic approaches. These included Stanford based Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka, MD and Edgar Engleman, MD; Kathleen Giacomini, PhD, and Kevan Shokat, PhD from UCSF; and Hugh Rosen, MD, PhD, from the Scripps Research Institute.

Later that afternoon, attendees had the rare opportunity to interact with six top pharmaceutical executives and philanthropists: Ken Frazier, CEO of Merck; Robert Bradway, CEO of Amgen; Joseph Jimenez, former CEO of Novartis; Brent Saunders, CEO of Allergan; Patrick Soon-Shiong, MD, CEO of Nantworks; and Sanford Weill, the Chairman Emeritus of Citigroup and CEO of Casa Rosa Ventures. In this “View from the Top” session moderated by Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, the panelists offered their perspectives on drug discovery, including: the future of personalized medicine, the importance of focusing on disease prevention rather than treatment, and the concept that drug pricing could eventually be based on treatment outcomes. The first day ended with the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award to Roy Vagelos, MD, former CEO of Merck and current Board chair of Regeneron. Dr. Vagelos was acknowledged in part for his role in leveraging the power of the pharmaceutical industry to make a major impact on global health. During his term as Merck CEO, he personally committed to providing the drug Ivermectin free of charge to anyone in the world for the treatment of elephantiasis and river blindness, with the latter having been since eradicated in multiple Central and South American countries due to Dr. Vagelos’ efforts.

The second day of the Symposium opened with a Keynote address from Janet Woodcock, MD, the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who provided a look inside the agency’s new drug regulatory program. This was followed by important presentations about funding priorities from Gary Gibbons, MD, the Director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and Maria Millan, MD, President and CEO of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). Later, the audience was treated to a panel of editors representing the top publications in biomedical science: the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Medicine, Science, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. The meeting concluded with a dynamic Shark Tank-style session, in which representatives from eight competitively selected start-up biotechnology companies pitched their ideas to a panel of scientists, venture capitalists, and CEOs. The panelists who provided feedback were: George Scangos, PhD (CEO of Vir), Robert Robbins, MD (President of the University of Arizona), Roy Vagelos, MD, Amy Chang, MSEE (CEO of Accompany), Ram Shriram (Founder of Sherpalo), and Wende Hutton, MBA (General Partner, Canaan). The goal of this session was to have this stellar panel identify strengths and weaknesses of the strategies described in each presentation, providing invaluable advice to these budding entrepreneurs.

The organizers of the meeting, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD; Sanjay Malhotra, PhD; Kuldev Singh, MD; Mark Mercola, PhD; and Chaitan Khosla, PhD, are thrilled with the success of this gathering, and are already looking forward to the next iteration, which will be held April 22-23, 2019.

___

Copyright Keystone Symposia, 2018. All rights reserved.

About Keystone Symposia:
Keystone Symposia is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1972 that convenes 50-60 open, international scientific research conferences each year across the full range of the life sciences – from cardiovascular disease to immunology to neurobiology. The conferences accelerate life science discovery by bringing together and fostering collaboration among the world’s leading and next generation of research scientists.

Visit Keystone Symposia at:

Visit Virtual Keystone Symposia at:

For more videos:

Follow us on Twitter:

Like us on Facebook:

Link to us on LinkedIn:

Outro music:
“Slider” by Blue Dot Sessions (

Continue Reading

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